Vampires in Literature: Opera Cloaks, Sparkles, and Prevailing Themes | The Artifice

 

vampires in literature

Jan 12,  · The portrayal of vampires in literature has continued to evolve. Richard Matheson gave vampires a zombie bent in 's "I Am Legend," where a vampire plague ravaged the planet. The Oxford English Dictionary dates the first appearance of the English word vampire (as vampyre) in English from , in a travelogue titled Travels of Three English Gentlemen published in The Harleian Miscellany in Vampires had already been discussed in French and German literature. Vampires also enjoyed popularity as unlikely action heroes. Blade, a half-vampire superhero who first appeared in comic books, was the focus of three films (, , ). Another popular film series, Underworld (, , , ), explored an ongoing war between vampires and werewolves.


Vampire - Wikipedia


Vampirealso spelled vampyrein popular legenda vampires in literature, often fanged, that preys upon humans, vampires in literature, generally by consuming their blood.

Vampires have been featured in folklore and fiction of various cultures for hundreds of years, predominantly in Europealthough belief in them has waned vampires in literature modern times. Because there is a long history of walking corpses and bloodsucking ghouls in folklore, it is difficult to pin down a distinct set of characteristics consistently attributed only to vampires.

Central to vampire mythhowever, is the consumption of human vampires in literature or other essence such as bodily fluids or psychic energyfollowed closely by the possession of sharp teeth or fangs with which to facilitate this task. Vampires are typically said to be of pale skin and range in appearance from grotesque to preternaturally beautiful, depending on the tale.

Another frequently cited physical characteristic is the inability to cast a reflection or shadow, which often translates into an inability to be photographed or recorded on film.

A person may become a vampire in a variety vampires in literature ways, the most common of which is to be bitten by a vampire. Some people believed that babies born with teeth or on Christmas or between Christmas and Epiphany were predisposed to becoming vampires. While vampires usually do not die of disease or other normal human afflictionsand they are indeed often said to have faster-than-normal healing capabilities, there are various vampires in literature for their destruction.

The most popular of those include a wooden stake through the heartfire, decapitationand exposure to sunlight. Vampires are often depicted as being repelled by garlic, running water, or Christian implements such as crucifixes and holy water.

In some stories vampires may enter a home only if they have been invited, and in others they may be distracted by the scattering of objects such as seeds or grains that they are compelled to count, thereby enabling potential victims to escape. Creatures with vampiric characteristics have appeared at least as far back as ancient Greecevampires in literature, where stories were told of creatures that attacked people in their sleep and drained their bodily fluids.

Tales of walking corpses that drank the blood of the living and spread plague flourished in medieval Europe in times of disease, and people lacking a modern understanding of infectious disease came to believe that those who became vampires preyed first upon their own families. Research from the 20th and 21st centuries has posited that characteristics associated with vampires can be traced back to certain diseases such as porphyriawhich makes one sensitive to sunlight; vampires in literaturevampires in literature, which causes wasting; pellagraa disease that thins the skin; and rabieswhich causes biting and general sensitivities that could lead to repulsion by light or garlic.

Vampire myths were especially popular in eastern Europe, and the word vampire most likely originates from that region. Digging up the bodies of suspected vampires was practiced in many cultures throughout Europe, vampires in literature, and it is thought that the vampires in literature characteristics of decomposition—such as receding gums and the appearance of growing hair and fingernails—reinforced the belief that corpses were in fact continuing some manner of life after death.

Also possibly contributing to this belief was the pronouncement of death for people who were not dead. Belief in vampires led to such rituals as staking corpses through the heart before they were buried. In some cultures the dead were buried facedown to vampires in literature them from finding their way out of their graves, vampires in literature. The modern incarnation of vampire myth seems to have stemmed largely from Gothic European literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, about the time vampire hysteria was peaking in Europe.

Those works and others inspired subsequent material for the stage. Dracula is arguably the most important work of vampire fiction. The tale of the Transylvanian vampires in literature who uses supernatural abilities, including mind control and shape-shifting, to prey upon innocent victims inspired countless works thereafter. Many popular vampire characteristics—such as methods of survival and destruction, vampires as aristocracyvampires in literature, and even vampires being of eastern European origin—were solidified in this popular novel and especially through its film adaptation starring Hungarian-born actor Bela Lugosi.

Dracula in turn inspired the film Nosferatuin which a vampire was first depicted as being vulnerable to sunlight, vampires in literature. For several decades the vast majority of vampire fiction, whether on page or stage or screen, showed the influence of Dracula, vampires in literature. In the 20th century vampires began to turn from being depicted as predominantly animalistic creatures and instead displayed a broader range of human characteristics.

The popular American television soap opera Dark Shadows —71 featured a lovelorn vampire, Barnabas Collins. Vampire fiction entered a new era, however, with the sympathetic portrayal by Anne Rice in her novel Interview with the Vampire Interview with the Vampire was highly popular and sparked a revival of vampire fiction that lasted into the 21st century, and subsequent vampire stories vampires in literature to use characteristics established by Rice.

Rice herself wrote several more books in what subsequently became known as the Vampire Chronicles, some of which were later adapted for film.

The vampire as a misunderstood romantic hero picked up steam in the later part of the 20th century, particularly in the United States.

In Chelsea Quinn Yarbro began publishing her series of Count Saint-Germain books, vampires in literature, the main character of which is a vampire of moral character whose bite is an erotic experience.

In many tales vampires are characterized as promiscuous, their appetite for human blood paralleling their sexual appetite. In Lori Herter published Obsessionone of the first vampire novels to be categorized as romance rather than science fictionfantasyor horror. Buffy the Vampire Slayera television show in which the title character has a star-crossed romance with a vampire, aired from to Vampire romance for teens gained popularity at the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st, with books such as the Vampire Diaries series by L.

Smith and the Twilight Saga by Stephenie Meyer. The Twilight Saga, with its high-school romance and vampires that sparkle in the sun rather than bursting into flames, became a cultural sensation, ensuring a vampire trend for years to come. Vampires also enjoyed popularity as unlikely action heroes. Blade, vampires in literature, a half-vampire superhero who first appeared in comic books, was the focus of three films, vampires in literature, Another popular film series, Underworld, explored an ongoing war between vampires and werewolves.

Although vampires had by the 20th century largely become creatures of fantasy, urban myths about vampires continued to persist. As late as the early 20th century, some villages in Bulgaria still practiced corpse impaling. Article Media, vampires in literature. Info Print Print.

Table Of Contents. Submit Feedback. Thank you for your feedback. Introduction Characteristics History. Written By: Alison Eldridge. See Article History. Characteristics Because there is a long history of walking corpses and bloodsucking ghouls in folklore, it is difficult to pin down a distinct set of characteristics consistently attributed only to vampires. Start Your Free Trial Today. Learn More in these related Britannica articles: Slavic religion: Communal banquets and related practices.

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vampires in literature

 

Jan 12,  · The portrayal of vampires in literature has continued to evolve. Richard Matheson gave vampires a zombie bent in 's "I Am Legend," where a vampire plague ravaged the planet. Vampires also enjoyed popularity as unlikely action heroes. Blade, a half-vampire superhero who first appeared in comic books, was the focus of three films (, , ). Another popular film series, Underworld (, , , ), explored an ongoing war between vampires and werewolves. The Oxford English Dictionary dates the first appearance of the English word vampire (as vampyre) in English from , in a travelogue titled Travels of Three English Gentlemen published in The Harleian Miscellany in Vampires had already been discussed in French and German literature.